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Track Spending More Effectively with Money Management

Track Spending More Effectively with Money Management

Tracking your spending used to be an ongoing and neverending task. To live is to spend and that spending has to be tracked somehow. Times change and pen and paper, once your most reliable option, were made obsolete with the introduction of computers, excel, and the game-changing spreadsheet. While spreadsheets brought with them some much needed added features like built-in calculation and a customizable grid, it still required diligent manual input and oversight. With the increasing connection between your financial information and your phone, it is now possible to automate expenditure tracking to a degree of detail that would have previously required cutting your hours back to part-time. Furthermore, this technology can boil those trends down into easy-to-digest graphs and charts that give you insight and suggestions on your spending habits. With optional email or text alerts backing it all up, you’ll never feel out of the loop when it comes to your accounts. That’s why we reached out to an industry leader for help in making this a reality. We don’t think you should be wasting your time stressing lines on a spreadsheet or staring at a computer screen poring over your daily/weekly/monthly/yearly spending. We are proud to provide Money Management to help you effortlessly monitor your spending easier and more effectively. Money Management is a personal financial wellness tool designed to help you track all account activity in a streamlined and easy to manage platform. We chose to offer Money Management after experiencing its all-encompassing financial summarization functionality. This functionality allows you to track spending, create a budget, and assists in improving overall financial well-being. It’s free...
Medical Expenses Have Gone Crazy. You Don’t Have to Do the Same

Medical Expenses Have Gone Crazy. You Don’t Have to Do the Same

In the United States, healthcare has grown into a $3 trillion industry. That’s $3,000,000,000,000. That’s a lot of zeros—so many that for most of us, the number doesn’t even seem real. But if we break it down to a personal level, that means the average American spends more than $11,000 per year on healthcare costs. If that doesn’t sound troublesome, consider the fact that the annual cost of healthcare for a family of four tops $28,000. With the median household income coming in at $63,000 per year, that means the average US family can wind up spending more than 40% of their annual income on medical-related expenses. That’s steep. Even with employer-provided health insurance, which covers roughly 56% of the US population, the employee contribution and out-of-pocket deductibles can leave families buried under an avalanche of medical debt. It’s hard to understand how an industry responsible for personal care can seem so unconcerned when it comes to the financial state of its patients. But with a growing number of hospitals being operated as investor-owned, for-profit businesses, return on investment often seems more important than compassionate patient care. Difficult Times Call for Creative Approaches As medical bills continue to climb, the corresponding rise in medical collection agencies only perpetuates the healthcare industry’s callous reputation. In a conversation about the cold, impersonal nature of medical collections, Elizabeth Rosenthal, author of An American Sickness, observed, “…to them [collection agencies], a bill is a bill is a bill. They don’t care if it’s for somebody’s heart transplant…or if someone spent a lot more money on a Rolex watch that they couldn’t afford.” Over...
Credit Card Regret: It’s More Common Than You Think

Credit Card Regret: It’s More Common Than You Think

“Regrets, I’ve had a few. But then again, too few to mention.” – Frank Sinatra If you’re the kind of person who prefers to play it safe, there’s a good chance that, like Ol’ Blue Eyes, your list of regrets is mercifully short. But if you’re the adventurous type who’s more likely to yell “YOLO!” than take the time to consider pros and cons, you may have made more unfortunate decisions than you care to admit. Either way, it’s safe to say we all have regrets. And if we’re being honest, some of them are probably related to finances. Going into credit card debt is one of the most common financial regrets. According to a recent NerdWallet survey, “About 6 in 7 Americans (86%) who have or had credit card debt say they regret it.” With numbers that high, it’s safe to assume most of us would make different credit decisions if given a chance. Have you ever signed up for a new credit card and immediately wished you hadn’t? If so, the following reasons will probably ring a bell. If not, pay close attention. You can learn a lot from others’ mistakes. Common Reasons for Credit Card Regret If you’ve ever opened a new credit card account and felt that distinctive twinge that tells you it was a bad decision, there’s a pretty good chance you filled out that credit application for the wrong reason. Bad reasons come in a variety of forms. Here are a few of the most common: You wanted that sign-up swag. – T-shirts. Koozies. Collapsible drink coolers. It doesn’t matter what it is;...
Sun Sentinal 2019

Sun Sentinal 2019

  We are honored to have been named Best Mid-size Employer by the Sun Sentinal 2019 Top Workplaces. A huge thank you to our incredible employees who work together as a team and as a family. We would like to thank each and every one of them for their dedication and commitment to the purpose of guiding Power Financial Credit Union family members to better lives today and for all generations to...
Save Money by Taking Your Spring Cleaning to the Next Level!

Save Money by Taking Your Spring Cleaning to the Next Level!

Now that March has gone out like a lamb (a waterlogged lamb in many parts of the country), Springtime is here, and that means it’s time for that beloved annual tradition—Spring Cleaning. In surveys conducted by the American Cleaning Institute, responses indicate that as many as 91% of Americans and 96% of Millennials engage in spring cleaning, so it seems safe to say we’re all in this together. As you open the windows and begin your routine of washing, sweeping, dusting, and decluttering, the goal is to spruce up your home’s interior while eliminating things you no longer need. When done correctly, spring cleaning can actually make you happier and healthier. So, it makes sense to be as thorough as possible. This year, while you’re busy cleaning your fixtures and furniture, it might be a good idea to update some common household items to more energy-efficient options. A more efficient home is an investment that can save you money all year long, and we’re pretty sure lower utility bills will boost your mood as well! Simple Ways to Make Your Home More Energy Efficient This Spring Energy-Saving Power Switch By completely cutting off all power when an electronic device isn’t in use, these plug-in adapters reduce the costly effects of “vampire energy.” While the term sounds scarier than it should, vampire energy refers to the power that still flows to a device even when it is turned off. These handy switches can be purchased online or in your local hardware store for $10 or less. And with prices that low, your return on investment can be quite substantial. Low-Flow...
Should You Keep Separate Checking Accounts When You Get Married?

Should You Keep Separate Checking Accounts When You Get Married?

You found “The One.” You popped the question, and they said “Yes.” You both said, “I do.” Your honeymoon was incredible. Now, you’re back to reality and settling into your new life together. Suddenly, you’re faced with a wave of everyday decisions you hadn’t previously thought about. Who sleeps on which side of the bed? Which toothpaste should you buy? Whose parents will you visit at Thanksgiving? What about Christmas? Some decisions are trivial, but other dilemmas feel far more important. But then, when that first monthly bill shows up and you have to decide who pays it, you come face-to-face with one more crucial decision: Should you combine your finances and get a joint checking account? For years, financial advisors and relationship gurus have sparred over the potential dangers and benefits of joining two individual bank accounts into one. The most challenging part of this debate is that both sides appear to make valid points, which can leave you and your spouse wondering what to do. Before we go any further, it’s important to remember that just as each person in a marriage is a unique individual, every relationship is different. And while it’s wise to seek counsel and take advice, you’ll ultimately need to figure out what works best for you. In the points to follow, we’ll set out to share a few perspectives that can help you determine the best way for you to build a financial foundation that works for your family. The Case for Separate Checking Accounts In an interview with CNBC, David Back, co-founder of AE Wealth Management, advised, “You should have your...
Check Your Finances Before Changing Jobs

Check Your Finances Before Changing Jobs

Jobs are funny things. As soon as you get one, there’s a temptation to start thinking a different job could be better. Sometimes people find themselves stuck in a role that doesn’t fit their personality or skill set. Other times they love their job but believe a change would provide the opportunity to earn more money—and in turn, more peace of mind. Whatever the reason, if you’ve been part of the workforce for more than a few months, you’ve probably spent more than a few minutes wondering if a new job might be the secret to a better life. And if that’s the case, statistics indicate you’re not the only one. According to the US Department of Labor, the average American changes jobs 12 times during their career. So, if you haven’t tested the job market yet, the law of averages seems to indicate you will eventually. And while job transitions are relatively common these days, it’s still important to approach each change with careful consideration. Not only will the new role involve learning new skills, working with new people, and establishing a new routine, it will also require significant financial planning—at least in the transition period. So, how can you set yourself up for success while transitioning to a new endeavor? By making sure your finances are in order; that’s how. 5 Financial Tips to Remember When Considering a Job Change Check your savings. If you already have another job lined up, your savings may only need to tie you over until your new paychecks start rolling in. This might sound like a minor concern, but depending on...
5 Ways to Save for Summer in 5 Weeks

5 Ways to Save for Summer in 5 Weeks

Summer vacation. During your elementary, middle, and high school years, those two magical words meant three months of freedom! No school, no waking up early, no early bedtimes. It was your annual reward for grinding through the previous nine months of academic pursuits. Yet somehow, summer always managed to fly by faster than it was supposed to! Now that you’re an adult, your summertime respite has probably shortened considerably. Instead of three months, you might get a week away—maybe two, if you’re lucky. But just like when you were young, you always wish your time away could last just a little bit longer. It seems like no matter how old you get, summer vacation still holds a special kind of magic. There’s still time to save for summer vacation! But even with all the sun-kissed nostalgia that makes summer vacation a lifelong treat, there’s one thing that can ruin the fun faster than a thunderstorm at the swimming pool: vacation-related debt. Summertime memories are fun to recall, but it’s not nearly as fun to receive monthly reminders that you’re still paying the price for that fun—plus interest. If you’re like most people, summer usually sneaks up on you. You start the year with good intentions, but somewhere along the way you forget to set aside money to cover your vacation plans. With summer only a few weeks away, you might be wondering whether it’s possible to save enough money to cover this year’s vacation. We’re happy to report that it’s absolutely possible! It will take some discipline, but you can do it. Here are five tips to help you...

Fraudulent Email Notification

Fictitious email messages, allegedly initiated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) regarding funds purportedly under the control of the OCC, have been sent to some credit union members. Any communication claiming that the OCC is involved in holding any funds for the benefit of any individual or entity is fraudulent. The OCC does not participate in the transfer of funds for, or on behalf of, individuals, business enterprises, or governmental entities. If you have received an email from the following email address, do not respond – it is fraudulent: office2comptroller90@gmail.com deadhead@kfedisbroke.com name@officeocc.com The perpetrators may request, among other data, bank account information, including bank statements, with the purported purpose of making a large dollar deposit into your account. Do not respond in any manner to any proposal supposedly issued by the OCC that requests personal account information, or that requires the payment of any fee in connection with the...
Make Spring Cleaning Pay Off This Year!

Make Spring Cleaning Pay Off This Year!

People sure do like their stuff. Whether it’s the latest tech gadgets or knick-knacks that have been passed down through generations, the things we own hold a special place in our hearts and homes. So, when our possessions pile up, as is their tendency, what’s the logical thing to do? That’s right—rent a self-storage unit. What? That’s not the answer you were expecting? According to a report by Sparefoot, one out of every 11 Americans pays for storage space to keep their overflowing belongings. That’s right, not only are people finding additional ways to store their things, they’re paying good money to do it—$38 billion a year, to be exact. Spending money to stow away various items you don’t need and will probably never use—seems silly doesn’t it? We agree. In fact, we think springtime is the perfect season to do the exact opposite. Clean house. Cash in. Over the past few years, de-cluttering has seen a spike in popularity, thanks in large part to proponents like Joshua Becker and Marie Kondo. While experts like Kondo preach the soul-cleansing benefits of getting rid of anything that doesn’t “spark joy,” we recommend doing it for an entirely different reason. Cash. Cold, hard cash. Don’t get us wrong, we big fan of the physical and emotional perks that come from cleaning house, but we also believe that making a little extra money would make you feel pretty good too. If you’re inspired but unsure where to start, we’ve compiled a helpful list of everyday items that carry solid resale value and the best ways to sell them. Electronics Maybe you just...